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About the area:

Llangammarch Wells

Llangammarch Wells is a village in the parish of Irfon Valley in Powys, mid Wales, within the historic County of Brecknockshire. It is the smallest of the spa towns of mid Wales, alongside Llanwrtyd Wells, Builth Wells and Llandrindod Wells.

The spa was focused on a barium well, which is now closed, but the village is still popular with visitors and anglers. It was also famed for the horse fairs that were held here.

The old village is centred around the parish church of St Cadmarch. There are two hotels, a public house, a Post Office/village shop, St Cadmarch’s church and the Nazareth Methodist Chapel. It benefits from a railway station on the Heart of Wales line and lies on Route 43 of the National Cycle Network

Nestled in the foothills of Mynydd Epynt, Llangammarch Wells is a very rural community. The land around is largely moorland or agricultural, the latter used for livestock farming. It is close to the Epynt Way, a fantastic resource for walkers, cyclists and riders with its waymarked routes and stunning scenery, and is 8 miles from Builth Wells, the home of the Royal Welsh Show.

Llangammarch Wells has always been and remains an ideal venue for the fisherman with many miles of river available to fish for trout, chub, grayling and late season salmon. Both day and season tickets are available.

Cefn Gorwydd

The hamlet of Cefn Gorwydd used to have a Post Office/shop, and also in days long gone, a smithy and an inn. It is now mainly residential with the very beautiful Gosen Chapel.

Tirabad

​There is evidence of Roman occupation here and there is a Roman road passing through the parish from Caerau, near Llangammarch to Llandovery. This was the major road until the 19th century when the present town of Llanwrtyd was created.

 

There was a pre Norman parish of 3220 acres ad the name means "the abbot's land"; the village belonged to Strata Florida abbey in the Middle Ages.

Many people had to leave the village during World War II when the Army acquired the nearby Epynt for training. The village expanded in the early 1950s when houses, a school, hall and shop were built for forestry workers.

 

St. David's Church (now closed) was built in 1726 and is the only Georgian church in Breconshire.

 

Just outside the village is the Tirabad Centre, an outdoor pursuits centre run by the Tirabad Residential Educational Trust and owned jointly by three state schools in England- Charters in SunningdaleThe Emmbrook near Wokingham and Maiden Erlegh in Earley.